The Top 4 Myths and Facts About Root Canal Treatment

Root canal treatment is a dental procedure recommended by dentists when there is trauma or infection in the nerve or pulp found in a tooth’s canal. The trauma or infection can be caused by various reasons or factors, which include the following:

  • The presence of abscess or decay, also known as an infection, on a tooth.
  • Trauma or injury on the tooth, such as a chipped or broken tooth, which results in the exposure of the nerve.
  • The slow death of a tooth due to aging or previous trauma which was not treated immediately.

Root Canal Therapy Myths and Facts

A leading Laurel, MD dentist says that root canal therapy is widely regarded as the most feared dental procedure. However, this is mainly due to the inaccurate information many people have about this treatment.

Below are some of the most common root canal therapy myths and the truth behind them:

  • Myth: Root canal therapy is painful.

Fact: According to a study published by the American Association of Endodontists, the perception that people have about root canal therapy being painful comes from the early treatment methods used to perform this procedure. Dental experts also say that if you are already suffering from pain on the day of your treatment, your apprehension and fear may heighten the sensations you feel during the procedure.

In actuality, root canal therapy is done to provide pain relief to patients. The majority of people who undergo this dental procedure admit they did not experience any pain during the treatment and that they felt better afterwards.

  • Myth: Your tooth has to hurt really bad before you can undergo root canal therapy. 

Fact: You don’t have to be suffering from a really bad toothache for a dentist to recommend root canal therapy. In many cases, teeth that are already dead but are not at all painful may require root canal treatment to prevent the tooth from becoming further infected.

  • Myth: There is no immediate need to undergo root canal therapy since the tooth will be taken out eventually. 

Fact: There is no correct reason to assume that the treated tooth will still be extracted in the future. In general, most root canal treatments are successful and will result in the tooth being saved.

  • Myth: You will have to visit your dentist several times to complete the therapy. 

Fact: Your dentist can complete the therapy in one to two appointments. However, there are various factors that have to be considered to determine the number of appointments needed to complete a root canal procedure. These include the extent of the infection and the difficulty of the procedure. Also, tooth restoration is essential after the procedure to make it functional again. Leading dentists say that the appointments needed to completely restore the tooth should not be considered part of the root canal procedure.

5 Health Problems Your Dentist Can Predict

You probably think your dentist focuses solely on your oral health, but whenever he inspects your mouth, he’s actually looking after your overall health. The reality is that the condition of your mouth is one of the most reliable indicators of your actual well-being.

Numerous studies have proven that many dental problems are directly linked to serious health woes. They are often manifestations of abnormalities in your system, or they serve as tell-tale signs that you are at high risk of developing serious medical problems. For example, cavities or signs of tooth decay do not only indicate poor oral hygiene practice; they also indicate your unhealthy consumption of sugary or starchy foods that can lead to heart disease and diabetes. Meanwhile, yellowish, brittle teeth can indicate malnutrition (common among people who are always dieting) and being prone to kidney disease.

When you have a dental appointment, a good dentist doesn’t just see the condition of your mouth. Listed below are the five health problems your dentist can predict just from your check-up.

Cardiovascular disease

Whenever your dentist spots new cavities on your teeth, he knows right away that you’ve been eating too many snacks with trans fatty acids. Through trans fatty acids do not really cause cavities, they are, however, always present with ingredients such as fermentable carbs that do lead to cavities. High amounts of trans fatty acids and fermentable carbs are known to lead to heart disease.

Diabetes

Cavities are also indicators of unhealthy eating habits that cause diabetes to flare up. Frequent consumption of sugary drinks and foods tends to create calcular deposits that can lead to tooth decay, and at the same time, raise blood glucose, which is dangerous for people who are genetically prone to developing diabetes.

Cancer

Your dentist knows if you’re a smoker or drinker – the color of your teeth and gums are dead giveaways, along with other factors. If you have these unhealthy habits, your dentist can actually tell how seriously they’ve affected your health and how susceptible you are to developing cancer by the condition of your mouth.

Obesity

The dental situation that indicates susceptibility to heart disease and diabetes applies to obesity as well.

Alzheimer’s Disease

Studies have already established the link between dementia problems such as Alzheimer’s and loss of teeth. Dentists these days don’t rule out the possibility of people with periodontal disease developing Alzheimer’s.

If you want a dentist who will not only look after your oral health but your overall well-being as well, our dentist in Burtonsville, MD, Dr. Aaron Nicholas, is the man for the job. Contact us today and set up your first appointment!

“I Need a Root Canal, Now What?”

Root Canal DetailsRoot Canal Details: How Long It Takes and Other Details

Out of all dental procedures, root canal treatment is perhaps the most avoided or disliked one — primarily due to its reputation as a procedure that comes with a great deal of pain.

You’ve heard people utter something like this before: I’d rather go through root canal than (do something else) — as if root canal were the worst experience in the world you could ever endure, and saying that you would choose it over something else means it’s the absolute last resort for torture options.

Arm yourself with information 

According to Burtonsville Dentist, Dr. Aaron Nicholas, the perception of root canal treatments stem from people’s lack of correct knowledge of it. Most people would be reluctant to learn about it or even try to look for alternatives if it were recommended by their dentists.

It helps to find root canal facts and to understand the procedure in order to see how it can benefit a patient. To this end, provided below are some important root canal details:

How many visits does the entire treatment involve?

This will depend on the patient’s individual case, but there are generally two options:

Single-visit

This is an approach that has gradually become more accepted since the 1990s. Advanced dental technology has made it possible for dentists to complete the procedure in a single appointment. This is the most important benefit of this option since a patient will only need to be seen for the root canal in one sitting.

Two-visit

Traditionally, dentists broke up root canal treatments into two separate visits. During the first visit, cleaning and shaping the root canal system of the affected tooth is done. After about a week, the patient will return to have the tooth filled and sealed.

This approach is ideal in terms of allowing the dentist to resolve any flare-ups that occur and to monitor how the healing of the tooth progresses.

The question of whether a patient should undergo a single-visit or two-visit treatment will depend on the level of infection of the affected tooth’s root canal system.

How long does a single root canal appointment last?

One root canal appointment would typically last anywhere between 30 and 60 minutes, with 90 minutes being the possible maximum. It is still dependent on the patient’s unique needs, the available dental equipment, and the needs or preferences discussed with the dentist.

If I am pregnant, can I receive root canal therapy?

Yes. However, the dentist will need to take a number of crucial issues into consideration when devising a root canal treatment plan for a pregnant woman, such as:

  • The use of medications and x-rays. Root canal treatments can make use of local anesthetics, analgesics or antibiotics and dentists must use the safest options for pregnant women. Likewise, the dentists may need to take x-rays of the affected tooth and the pregnant patient must be properly protected.
  • The length and number of appointments. The patient must be kept physically comfortable.
  • The timing of the treatment. A pregnant woman may have an infection or may be experiencing discomforts caused by the pregnancy. In this case, the dentist may decide if the procedure can be pushed through or delayed until a particular trimester or after the birth.

For more root canal details, contact your local Burtonsville dentist at Nicholas Dental Care.

The Top 4 Myths and Facts About Root Canal Treatment

Root Canal TreatmentThe Top 4 Myths and Facts About Root Canal Treatment

Root canal treatment is a dental procedure recommended by dentists when there is trauma or infection in the nerve or pulp found in a tooth’s canal. The trauma or infection can be caused by various reasons or factors, which include the following:

  • The presence of abscess or decay, also known as an infection, on a tooth.
  • Trauma or injury on the tooth, such as a chipped or broken tooth, which results in the exposure of the nerve.
  • The slow death of a tooth due to aging or previous trauma which was not treated immediately.

Root Canal Therapy Myths and Facts

Leading Burtonsville, MD dentist, Dr. Aaron Nicholas says that root canal therapy is widely regarded as the most feared dental procedure. However, this is mainly due to the inaccurate information many people have about this treatment.

Below are some of the most common root canal therapy myths and the truth behind them:

  1. Myth: Root canal therapy is painful.

Fact: According to a study published by the American Association of Endodontists, the perception that people have about root canal therapy being painful comes from the early treatment methods used to perform this procedure. Dental experts also say that if you are already suffering from pain on the day of your treatment, your apprehension and fear may heighten the sensations you feel during the procedure.

In actuality, root canal therapy is done to provide pain relief to patients. Majority of people who undergo this dental procedure admit they did not experience any pain during the treatment and that they felt better afterwards.

  1. Myth: Your tooth has to hurt really bad before you can undergo root canal therapy.

Fact: You don’t have to be suffering from a really bad toothache for a dentist to recommend root canal therapy. In many cases, teeth that are already dead but are not at all painful may require root canal treatment to prevent the tooth from becoming further infected.

  1. Myth: There is no immediate need to undergo root canal therapy since the tooth will be taken out eventually.

Fact: There is no correct reason to assume that the treated tooth will still be extracted in the future. In general, most root canal treatments are successful and will result in the tooth being saved.

  1. Myth: You will have to visit your dentist several times to complete the therapy.

Fact: Your Burtonsville dentist can complete the therapy in one to two appointments. However, there are various factors that have to be considered to determine the number of appointments needed to complete a root canal procedure. These include the extent of the infection and the difficulty of the procedure. Also, tooth restoration is essential after the procedure to make it functional again. Leading dentists say that the appointments needed to completely restore the tooth should not be considered part of the root canal procedure.

If you still have additional questions about an upcoming root canal treament, contact the professionals at Nicholas Dental Care today!

 

 

Possible Causes of Tooth Pain

If you have experienced tooth pain, you understand that there is nothing nice about it. From mild inconvenience to the disruption of your normal routines, tooth pain can stop you in your tracks.

What are the common causes of tooth pain?

Quite simply, there are several possible causes of tooth pain. You must look at the other symptoms you are experiencing to zero in on the actual source of your pain. Burtonsville, MD dentist shares the following insights:

If you are experiencing tooth sensitivity to hot or cold food or drinks

Typically, the discomfort you may feel is fleeting and you may not be dealing with a serious problem. Often, this type of toothache can be attributed to tooth decay, a loose dental filling, receding gums, or brushing too hard.

The best thing that you can do is to keep your teeth and gums clean using a toothbrush with soft bristles and a toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth. Do not brush your teeth more than twice a day. You may also use your toothpaste as an ointment on the affected tooth.

If you are experiencing sensitivity to hot or cold food or drinks after undergoing a treatment

Some types of dental treatments can lead to the inflammation of the tooth’s pulp. In turn, that can lead to increased sensitivity to temperature extremes.

Usually, this type of tooth pain will subside in a matter of days. However, if cavities have been removed from your teeth or if you have recently gotten a crown or dental filling, it may take between one and two weeks before the pain is totally eliminated. Here, you can use mild pain relievers.

If the pain lingers after consuming hot or cold food or drinks

This may be a sign that the pulp of the affected tooth is inflamed or already dying either due to advanced tooth decay or trauma.

If you experience this type of toothache, your best option is to contact your Burtonsville area dentist. Your dentist can recommend the best course of action to take depending on your actual circumstance.

If you experience sharp pain when biting down on food

This type of tooth pain can be caused by tooth decay, a cracked tooth or a loose filling.

Your best option here is to visit your dentist. If the cause of the pain is tooth decay, your dentist will remove the decay or refer you to an endodontist for a root canal treatment. If the cause of the pain is a cracked tooth, your dentist will advise you on possible treatment options depending on the location and size of the crack.

If you are experiencing a toothache on your upper teeth or near the sinus area

This actual cause of this type of pain can be hard to determine because the upper back teeth and the sinus share the same nerves. It is possible that the pain you are experiencing may be caused by sinus congestion or by bruxism.

Visiting your dentist will help you identify the root cause of the tooth pain.

If you are experiencing sharp pain but cannot identify the affected tooth

The pain is possibly caused by a tooth’s pulp that has been severely infected and is dying. It is highly likely that the decay has already progressed toward a nerve.

If you are experiencing this type of toothache, see a dentist or endodontist as soon as possible. You may need to undergo a root canal treatment to remove the affected pulp.

If you are experiencing constant pain, swelling of the gums and sensitivity to touch

One of your teeth may be infected, and that tooth infection may have gone from the pulp toward the periodontal tissue.

You can use over-the-counter pain relievers for the pain, but it is highly likely that you will need to undergo root canal treatment. Now that you have identified possible causes of tooth pain, hopefully you are prepared to contact your local dentist to address the issue. 

Root Canal Process

Root Canal ProcessThe Root Canal Process | Steps to the Treatment

If you have a fractured tooth, or if you have tooth decay and the pulp of your tooth has become infected, your Laurel Dentist will most likely recommend a root canal procedure in order to salvage the tooth, protect it from further damage, and even restore its appearance. Here we break down the root canal process for you. 

A root canal is actually quite a simple process, and most of the time, there is minimal to no pain involved. To help you understand the root canal process further, a Laurel, MD dentist has detailed the steps to the treatment below.

  • To diminish physical discomfort, local anesthesia is administered via injection. This will numb the tooth as well as the tissue around it. If there’s pain due to an inflamed pulp, the dentist won’t commence the treatment until the pain is numbed by the anesthesia.
  • Once the area to be treated is properly numbed, a dental dam, which is a very thin sheet of rubber vinyl, will be applied to that area and the teeth around it. The tooth to be treated will poke through a hole in the covering material; this will ensure that the treatment will be carried out in a completely sterile way.
  • The dentist will then drill an access hole on the biting surface of the tooth. The hole will expose the pulp and nerves.
  • From the hole, the dentist will remove the diseased and dead pulp tissue and will proceed to clean out the root canals and pulp chamber. This seems like gnarly work, but there’s no pain to this part of the process. Once the pulp and damaged nerves are removed, that tooth will really not be able to feel pain anymore.
  • Disinfection using antiseptic and antibacterial solutions is carried out.
  • After disinfection, the canals will be shaped by a set of instruments. Shaping is necessary to ensure the proper application of fillings and sealers.
  • The dentist will clean the canals after shaping and make sure that all debris is gone before sealing.
  • Fillings (usually gutta-percha) will be applied to fill the hollowed space. The dentist will fill every crevice in the canals, compress the gutta-percha tightly, and get rid of air pockets before sealing.
  • The root canals are sealed to prevent reinfection.
  • A temporary or permanent filling will be applied to cover the access hole, and then the dental dam is removed.
  • If the tooth lacks sufficient structure to protect the filling, the dentist will place a post made of metal or plastic in one of the canals.

Root Canal Aftercare

After this root canal process, the dentist will prescribe an antibiotic to prevent infection and to expedite healing. In addition to an antibiotic, dentists will also prescribe pain relievers because there may be slight soreness in the treated area afterwards. The Laurel, MD dentist says shares that at this time, you may ask about the kind of restoration that is suitable for your treated tooth.

This is the step-by-step root canal process. If you were afraid before that it would hurt, now you know that it’s a quick treatment and that there’s very minimal pain (if any at all) to it. If you would like additional information about a root canal, contact your Laurel MD dentistNicholas Dental Care.

 

When Is Tooth Extraction Your Best Option?

tooth extractionInstances Where Tooth Extraction Is Your Best Option

Advances in the field of dentistry have allowed dental professionals to help their patients keep their teeth and avoid tooth extraction.

However, there are instances wherein having a tooth extracted is the better option to take. One such instance is if the patient needs orthodontia which is sometimes necessary when the teeth are crowded. The only possible way to make room for the other teeth is through extraction.

If a tooth has been severely decayed or if its damage extends to the center of the tooth (pulp), your dentist may recommend having the tooth pulled out if other treatments like root canal therapy cannot solve the problem, and if the risk of infection is high.

Some patients may need to have their teeth extracted prior to undergoing chemotherapy or an organ transplant. These treatments are deemed to be delicate and the possibility of an infection must be avoided at all costs.

Finally, if your teeth have loosened up due to periodontal or gum disease, your Silver Spring dentist may recommend an extraction.

 

What happens during an extraction and who can perform this procedure?

Extractions may be performed by dentists and oral surgeons. Before actually pulling out a tooth (or teeth), a local anesthetic is applied to the area where the tooth to be extracted is located. The anesthetic will numb that area. If you are having more than one tooth pulled or if the tooth to be extracted is impacted, your dentist may use a general anesthetic that will help prevent you from feeling any pain throughout your body.

An oral surgery is performed when a tooth is impacted. Here, the dentist will need to make an incision on the gum and bone tissue before using forceps to loosen the tooth from the supporting structures holding it in its place. There are instances in which it is difficult to pull the tooth in one piece and that tooth needs to be removed in smaller pieces.

After the tooth has been successfully pulled out, it is normal for blood clots to form. In order to stop the bleeding, you will be asked to bite down on a gauze pad packed into the socket. In some instances, your dentist will use self-dissolving stitches to close the extraction site.

Recovery from a tooth extraction will take just a few days. In order to prevent infection, facilitate faster recovery and prevent or minimize discomfort, your Burtonsville dentist will give you detailed instructions about what to do and what not do while recovering.

If you think you might need a tooth extraction, contact your Silver Spring dentist for more information and to set up an appointment today!

What Is Endodontic Treatment?

Endodontic TreatmentEndodontic Treatment | Root Canal 

If your tooth has become diseased or injured, your dentist may recommend a few treatment options to you. In the past, these available options were limited. However, with advances in the field of dentistry, your dentist can help you save your teeth.

One such option that your dentist can recommend is endodontic treatment, also known as root canal treatment.

Endodontic treatment is a procedure that is used to treat the infection of the root canal system which is found in the center of a tooth. Infections are caused by bacteria that reside in the mouth and, when left unchecked, can invade your teeth. Infections typically occur when a patient has tooth decay, leaky fillings, or when a tooth has been damaged due to trauma.

 

Structure of a Tooth 

Contrary to what some people believe, the tooth is actually made up of two basic parts: the crown, which you can readily see in your mouth, and the root, which anchors the tooth in position and extends into the jaw. Your teeth are also comprised of the enamel, dentine, cementum and the dental pulp, which is the soft tissue inside the tooth.

The dental pulp is contained within the root canal system which extends from the crown to the root. The dental pulp is comprised of nerves and blood vessels. Now, when the pulp is infected by bacteria and multiplies and spreads, the pulp may die. Eventually, the bacteria and the substances these release will leak out to the end of the root canal through an opening where nerves and vessels enter.

When this happens, the tissues around the teeth become red and swollen. In turn, this can lead to pain and dental abscess.

The infection is treated by removing the bacteria either through extraction or through endodontic treatment where the dentist attempts to save the tooth.

After the bacteria has been eliminated, the dentist will use either a filling or crown to fill and seal the root canal. Afterwards, the inflamed tissue will heal naturally.

 

Why should you opt for root canal treatment?

The treatment offers a few advantages, chief of which is that you get to save your natural tooth. This means that you can chew your food efficiently and have a tooth that looks natural and has a normal biting force, and you’ll protect your other teeth from excessive wear and strain.

And contrary to the unfounded belief that root canal treatment is a tedious and difficult treatment, it is not. A lot of patients who have undergone the treatment compare it to getting their teeth filled. The treatment can be finished in one to two appointments, depending on a few factors including the severity of the problem and your personal circumstance.

The best way to determine if you endodontic treatment is to schedule a dental check-up with your local Burtonsville dentist. The dental professionals will be able to help you work through any questions or anxiety you might have.

Root Canal Expectations | Everything You Need to Know

root canal expectationsWhat Root Canal Expectations | Everything You Need to Know About Root Canal

Without prior knowledge of the nature of root canal, most people tend to subscribe to the popular belief that this procedure is a lengthy, painful one that ought to be feared and avoided. However, by arming yourself with the correct information from qualified dental professionals, you can understand the purpose of the procedure and the steps involved — not to mention discover the benefits that root canal can provide to your overall oral health. 

Here’s a few root canal expectations:

What is it?

Inside a tooth, underneath the visible white enamel and a harder layer called the dentin, a soft tissue called the pulp can be found. The pulp contains nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue. When this pulp becomes infected or inflamed, you may be advised to undergo root canal treatment; this involves removing the damaged pulp, cleaning and disinfecting the tooth, and then filling and sealing it.

What are the signs/causes that will let your dentist know you need root canal?

Root canal is typically recommended by a dentist (or a specialist who primarily performs root canal surgery, called an endodontist) when the pulp becomes inflamed or infected because of a crack in the tooth, a deep cavity, trauma, or dental treatments repeatedly performed on the tooth.

Other symptoms that could lead your dentist to prescribe root canal include lingering, spontaneous or positional tooth pain, an abscess (or referred pain due to an abscess), or the presence of a fistula on your gums.

Diagnosing whether root canal is needed or not requires careful and extensive consideration of your condition and all other possible treatments, so you need to engage in a thorough discussion with your dentist or the referred endodontist.

What are the steps of the procedure?

  1. If your dentist suspects that you require root canal, he will take or examine X-rays that can identify the location of the infected pulp. This can take place during the dental visits that come before the actual treatment.
  2. On the day of the treatment, the dentist will administer a local anesthesia to the affected tooth.
  3. Your dentist may place a rubber dam (a sheet of latex) over your mouth to isolate and protect the affected tooth from contamination.
  4. An opening is then made through the crown of the tooth to the pulp chamber.
  5. The dentist uses special files to remove the infected pulp and to clean out the canal. The canals will then be shaped as needed for the filling material. Afterwards, dentists use irrigation to remove debris and further clean out the canals.
  6. Next, the canals are filled with a permanent material, typically something called the gutta-percha, to prevent the canals from becoming contaminated or infected once again.
  7. A temporary filling material is now placed on top of the gutta-percha; this is meant to keep the opening sealed until the tooth receives a permanent filling or crown (also called a cap, which looks like a natural tooth) on top of the original tooth. Sometimes dentists place a post next to the gutta-percha in the root, for more support.
  8. Finally, the crown is cemented into place.

How long does the procedure take/how many visits will be required?

Root canal treatments can last for several hours so most patients are advised to bring a book or music player to help pass the time. The entire treatment can be completed in one or two appointments, depending on your specific dental condition and circumstances.

Some dentists will consider completing the treatment in one visit for the patient’s convenience, while others prefer to wait for the tooth to dry and empty out, and then disinfect it a second time, before filling it.

Is it painful?

You can expect some pain or soreness which typically peaks 17 to 24 hours after the procedure. You can take pain medication prescribed by the dentist or sleep with your head elevated for the first one or two nights to alleviate pain. In some cases, there may be no pain at all.

How should you take care of your teeth after root canal?

Practice good oral hygiene habits like brushing and flossing normally. Don’t bite or chew on the treated tooth until it has been restored with a crown, to prevent fracture.

What are the benefits of getting root canal?

After undergoing root canal, your tooth will appear natural, you can perform efficient chewing, and you can experience the normal biting force and sensations as you did before the treatment. Likewise, getting the treatment helps protect your other teeth from excess strain or wear.

If you have more questions about root canal expectations, call the dental professionals at Nicholas Dental Care. The knowledgeable dentists will help ease any anxiety you may have about an upcoming procedure.

 

Root Canal Preparation

root canal preparationHow Long Does a Root Canal Take?

The era of the dreaded dentist is over. Today, more and more people are realizing the significant importance of visiting a dentist and having access to professional dental health care. Unlike in the past wherein dental visits were feared (if not totally shunned), now an increasing number of people embrace the fact that investing in dental hygiene and expert care is a must, and may even be a pleasant experience under the care of the right dental team.

Is a Root Canal Really Something to Be Worried About?

One of the treatments that best illustrates this new perspective and experience in modern dentistry is the root canal. In the past, the root canal was one of the most anxiety-inducing procedures of all, since old methods could not contain or reduce the amount of pain involved during the process. Not anymore. Thanks to sophisticated technology and anesthesia, patients today will feel only very minimal to zero pain during a root canal procedure. And if you go to an endodontist who has advanced training, skills and specialized techniques, the experience will not be only painless, but also swift and comfortable.

How Fast is a Root Canal?

If you’re wondering how swift, or asking “how long does a root canal take?” the honest answer is that it can still take a longer time compared to other common procedures such as dental cleaning or application of dental fillings. But the timeframe has become considerably shorter due to modern techniques. Leading endodontists today can complete a root canal treatment in 90 to 120 minutes if no complications arise – or just about as long as your lunch hour.

However, just like any other medical process, the length of time and outcome of the procedure will still depend on the unique condition and circumstances of the patient. Some patients, for instance, may have their dental roots wrapped around a delicate area such as the sinuses. The procedure will then be much more complicated and therefore will take longer than usual.

Root Canal Preparation

That’s why proper root canal preparation is critical. Clinic consultations, X-rays and examinations are important before the actual root canal procedure. This way, your dentist can develop a specific treatment plan for you and provide complete information that will allow you to prepare well for your root canal treatment. Allow a bit more time than your scheduled period to cover unforeseeable changes and events. It’s best to pencil in important appointments such as meetings and gatherings the day or days after your root canal.

The Healing Process

To hasten your healing process and avoid pain after your treatment, take the anti-pain medications as prescribed by your dentist. Eat only the recommended food, and chew only using the untreated side. Lastly, show up for your follow-up treatments and check-up to ensure complete healing. 

If you have questions about root canal preparation, contact a dental professional in Burtonsville, MD today!